Breaking Local News

Charleston man stepping down as Cisco CEO

One of the Silicon Valley's longest-serving CEO from West Virginia is stepping down. Cisco Chairman and CEO John Chambers of Charleston said he planned to step down in July after more than 20 years in charge. Chambers will become board chairman for the computer networking company and says he plans to devote the rest of his time to philanthropic efforts.

City seeks to buy Middle East Mart for K-9 unit

A new bill would allow Charleston to purchase a building that currently houses the Middle East Mart. The Charleston Gazette reports the city plans to put a K-9 police unit in the building. The bill puts a price tag of more than $85,000 on the property with $2,000 in moving expenses for the owner of the Middle East Mart.

Rock, mud removal shuttered Rte. 60 in Cedar Grove

Traffic is flowing again on Route 60 in Cedar Grove. The Charleston Gazette reports the roadway in Kanawha County was shut-down Monday night for rock and mud removal. The road has been shuttered off and on ever since a rock slide happened on April 18th.

Charleston City Council questioning dumping of contaminated soil

Charleston City Council members are asking questions about a potential deal that would dump 800 tons of contaminated soil into the city landfill. At Monday night's City Council Finance Committee meeting, the Charleston Gazette reports that Mayor Danny Jones told a councilman to take his questions to the state Department of Environmental Protection. The mayor said putting the contaminated soil in the landfill could save $350,000. Some council members argue it's giving Freedom a break. The chemical company is filing for bankruptcy after it caused a massive chemical spill that prompted a drinking water ban for several days. Other council members argue the contaminated soil poses no risk to residents in a landfill.

CONTAMINATED SOIL

Charleston City Council members are asking questions about a potential deal that would dump 800 tons of contaminated soil into the city landfill. At Monday night's City Council Finance Committee meeting, The Charleston Gazette reports that Mayor Danny Jones told a councilman to take his questions to the state Department of Environmental Protection. The mayor said putting the contaminated soil in the landfill could save $35,000. Some council members argue it's giving Freedom a break. The chemical company is filing for bankruptcy after it caused a massive chemical spill that prompted a drinking water ban for several days. Other council members say the contaminated soil poses no risk to residents in a landfill.

Students to compete in bridge competition

Boosting students' interest in engineering and design - that's the goal of an upcoming petition. Middle and high school students from across the state will compete to build the best bridge design. Designs created by more than three dozen students will be tested with simulation software. Awards totaling nearly $7,000 will be given to the best designs; one competitor will receive a family pack of passes to walk underneath the New River Gorge Bridge. The West Virginia Bridge Design Contest will be held May 16th at the Advanced Technology Center in South Charleston.

Posted to www.wqbe.com
May. 4, 2015 10:09 PM CST
by acherry

Students to compete in bridge design contest

Boosting students' interest in engineering and design - that's the goal of an upcoming petition. Middle and high school students from across the state will compete to build the best bridge design. Designs created by more than three dozen students will be tested with simulation software. Awards totaling nearly $7,000 will be given to the best designs; one competitor will receive a family pack of passes to walk underneath the New River Gorge Bridge. The West Virginia Bridge Design Contest will be held May 16th at the Advanced

Tax code changes eyed by lawmakers

A legislative committee is eyeing changes to West Virginia's tax code. The Joint Selection Committee on Tax Reform held its second meeting Monday at the Capitol. Administration officials urged the committee to act cautiously in any revamps, saying the current system is competitive with surrounding states. At the meeting, The Charleston Gazette reports state Revenue Secretary Bob kiss told the 16-member legislative committee not to divorce the budget from tax policy. He cites Kansas with enacted corporate and income tax cuts in recent years that reports say have led to a budget deficit of 800-million in that state. The panel meets again in two weeks.

DEP criticizes Freedom's bankruptcy, clean plans

The state Department of Environmental Protection is blasting a chemical company's bankruptcy plan. State regulators accused Freedom Industries of embarking upon a scheme to bail on cleanup obligations at the site of last year's chemical spill. In Charleston bankruptcy court, The DEP says Freedom is eeking to funnel $2-and-a-half million to lawyers and professionals in the bankruptcy case and offering to put only 150-thousand-dollars towards cleanup efforts; the state agency wants $1 million dollars for cleanup. The DEP says Freedom still has a persistent problem with soil and water chemical contamination onsite. Freedom's January 2014 spill spurred a tap-water ban for 300,000 people for days.

Marine from West Virginia found dead at Camp Pendlton

The Marine Corps is investigating the death of a West Virginia marine based in Hawaii. The Marine Corps said in a statement Saturday that Gunnery Sgt. Eugene Jones of Montgomery was found unresponsive in his barracks room at the Staff Noncommissioned Officer Academy in Camp Pendleton in northern California.
He was found at 8 a.m. Wednesday, two days after checked in at the academy to take a course. Medical responders pronounced him dead at the scene. A marine spokesman says Jones was an integral part of the Installation Personnel Administration team. He is survived by his wife and three children.

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